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Handing a CD over to a promoter
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PostPosted: 15 October 2008 - 02:33:03 (147)  Reply with quote
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Do you reckon it's a good idea to put a tracklisting on it or not?
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hellosam
PostPosted: 15 October 2008 - 02:48:20 (158)  Reply with quote
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always

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hellosam what do you tell me....only things i want to hear
Indepth
PostPosted: 15 October 2008 - 02:51:27 (160)  Reply with quote
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Cool... Might sound like an obvious question really.
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desdel
PostPosted: 15 October 2008 - 03:09:32 (173)  Reply with quote
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be sure to check that everything is in order on the CD! errors happen!
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Aktas
PostPosted: 15 October 2008 - 04:11:51 (216)  Reply with quote
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hellosam wrote:
always


Really?
I always assumed otherwise...


why is this?

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RichardClairemont
PostPosted: 15 October 2008 - 04:51:22 (244)  Reply with quote
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It's an excellent idea. Alot of promoters won't have time to actually listen to the CD. If you put the tracklisting right there on the front, have a good attitude, look the part, and have a few good references to back you up, then he might take a glance over your list and make the decision to hire right then and there. The odds of him actually listening to even half the cd are very slim. If he does then he's just going to zip to the transitions (even though that's becoming less and less customary now that alot of people just use software for their promos). Always include a tracklist.
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Macman
PostPosted: 15 October 2008 - 10:30:51 (479)  Reply with quote
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I'd put some work into the artwork as well, making it stand out from the bunch.

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Macman What else is there?
rusch
PostPosted: 15 October 2008 - 10:33:25 (481)  Reply with quote
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RichardClairemont wrote:
It's an excellent idea. Alot of promoters won't have time to actually listen to the CD. If you put the tracklisting right there on the front, have a good attitude, look the part, and have a few good references to back you up, then he might take a glance over your list and make the decision to hire right then and there. The odds of him actually listening to even half the cd are very slim. If he does then he's just going to zip to the transitions (even though that's becoming less and less customary now that alot of people just use software for their promos). Always include a tracklist.


Not to mention that you really never want to make the mix longer than 20 minutes.

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hellosam
PostPosted: 15 October 2008 - 16:09:16 (714)  Reply with quote
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RichardClairemont wrote:
It's an excellent idea. Alot of promoters won't have time to actually listen to the CD. If you put the tracklisting right there on the front, have a good attitude, look the part, and have a few good references to back you up, then he might take a glance over your list and make the decision to hire right then and there. The odds of him actually listening to even half the cd are very slim. If he does then he's just going to zip to the transitions (even though that's becoming less and less customary now that alot of people just use software for their promos). Always include a tracklist.


yup. the tracklist is an immediate view into whether or not you are current. One person might submit a promo and its all "classics" (aka old crap that no one listens to anymore)- but not on purpose- that right there will let a person know whether or not they even want to give you the time of day. A good promoter will actually know music- so a good tracklist, might actually get listened to. Or, at the very least, youll have let him/her know just by the list that you have a least the SLIGHTEST clue as to what you are doing.

In my experience....no tracklist...no listen.

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hellosam what do you tell me....only things i want to hear
RichardClairemont
PostPosted: 16 October 2008 - 02:04:00 (127)  Reply with quote
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^^^ yea and that brings up an important point, which is how to structure a demo set. The way I think of it is to condense your shift into an 8-10 track package. This will give the promoter an idea of what to expect from you when you're actually on the decks, that is, the way you use the energy of the music, the way you handle peak time, and it will reveal a little more about how you view yourself as a professional.

I'd recommend something like this as a template:

1. Brand new track, fun, energetic, recognizable, big huge grooves, strong beats.
2. Something not so well known, but that the promoter and more loyal clientele will recognize, keep the energy up.
3. Go just a bit deeper, you're starting to create an atomosphere.
4. Something lower-energy and a bit more emotional, as long as its conducive to the atomosphere you're working on. It should end with a decent beat, start to build up the groove again.
5. Beats beats beats, keep the rhythm going, you're building back up.
6. Peak time! Recognizable, maybe even a classic or a fresh new megahit, this is where you drop the tracks they really came to hear.
7. Peak time! Keep it up!
8. Peak time! Keep it up!
9. This track should be something that fits the peak time mold, but caters to the hardcore clientele's tastes. An underground anthem, something that will make them feel superior to the noobs (dont worry, the noobs will love it because the hardcores love it)
10. End with whatever you want. If it's a big hit, the promoter will love to see you sending them out smiling, if it's a more of a personal statement, the promoter will probably appreciate you wanting to put your own spin on it, but saving it until the end.

Of course, that's the 10-Track Reader's Digest verison of what a 2 or 3 hour shift should sound like. Alot of people will tell you that breaking the energy in the early-middle of the set is a bad idea, but I do it beacuse it's usually when the casual clubbers (that is, not the hardcore crowd who are there just for the music) arrive (considering you're first shift) and they want to have a few drinks and stake the place out before they're ready to hit the floor, when they do, it's peak time, and it's go go go. Even if a promoter just glances at your tracklist, he/she will be just as interested in the order of the tracks as the tracks themselves. Bear in mind though, this isn't a prescription on how to handle the crowd during showtime, there's a million little variables that can throw a wrench in that formula, this is strictly for setting up a demo in a way that will make sense to a promoter.
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SonicAcademy
PostPosted: 03 November 2008 - 19:59:22 (874)  Reply with quote
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also remember to burn it onto a good quality cd and at a low speed (x16) so it wont skip.

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Sabre1489
PostPosted: 12 November 2008 - 09:37:03 (442)  Reply with quote
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RichardClairemont wrote:
^^^ yea and that brings up an important point, which is how to structure a demo set. The way I think of it is to condense your shift into an 8-10 track package. This will give the promoter an idea of what to expect from you when you're actually on the decks, that is, the way you use the energy of the music, the way you handle peak time, and it will reveal a little more about how you view yourself as a professional.

I'd recommend something like this as a template:

1. Brand new track, fun, energetic, recognizable, big huge grooves, strong beats.
2. Something not so well known, but that the promoter and more loyal clientele will recognize, keep the energy up.
3. Go just a bit deeper, you're starting to create an atomosphere.
4. Something lower-energy and a bit more emotional, as long as its conducive to the atomosphere you're working on. It should end with a decent beat, start to build up the groove again.
5. Beats beats beats, keep the rhythm going, you're building back up.
6. Peak time! Recognizable, maybe even a classic or a fresh new megahit, this is where you drop the tracks they really came to hear.
7. Peak time! Keep it up!
8. Peak time! Keep it up!
9. This track should be something that fits the peak time mold, but caters to the hardcore clientele's tastes. An underground anthem, something that will make them feel superior to the noobs (dont worry, the noobs will love it because the hardcores love it)
10. End with whatever you want. If it's a big hit, the promoter will love to see you sending them out smiling, if it's a more of a personal statement, the promoter will probably appreciate you wanting to put your own spin on it, but saving it until the end.

Of course, that's the 10-Track Reader's Digest verison of what a 2 or 3 hour shift should sound like. Alot of people will tell you that breaking the energy in the early-middle of the set is a bad idea, but I do it beacuse it's usually when the casual clubbers (that is, not the hardcore crowd who are there just for the music) arrive (considering you're first shift) and they want to have a few drinks and stake the place out before they're ready to hit the floor, when they do, it's peak time, and it's go go go. Even if a promoter just glances at your tracklist, he/she will be just as interested in the order of the tracks as the tracks themselves. Bear in mind though, this isn't a prescription on how to handle the crowd during showtime, there's a million little variables that can throw a wrench in that formula, this is strictly for setting up a demo in a way that will make sense to a promoter.


I'm making a demo on this template, here be the tracklist (Mind you, I'm catering to an audience that has a taste for the older stuff, but at the same time I'm trying to be diverse cheers ):

1. Proff - My Personal Summer [Anjunadeep]
2. Lores and Tripmain - Harmonics (Original Mix) [FS Music]
3. 11.8 - Red October (Abstract Vision Remix) [Pitch]
4. Michael Badal - Silk Road (Allende Remix) [Sedna]
5. Art of Trance - Breathe (Cygnus X Remix) [Platipus]
6. Airbase - Spion [Intuition]
7. Dreamcatcher - I Don't Wanna Lose My Way (Magik Muzik Remix) [Positiva]
8. Sonic Division - Day And Night (Akesson Remix) [Fraction]
9. Art of Trance - Easter Island (Original Mix) [Platipus]

Opinions on these tunage s?
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yROMAN
PostPosted: 24 October 2009 - 08:33:00 (397)  Reply with quote
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Affected by RichardClairemont's advice, as well some advice from other fellow Trance & Progressive club DJs, I have put the following track list together (all of your constructive criticism is welcome!):

01. Cosmic Gate feat. Emma Hewitt - "Not Enough Time" [Sied van Riel Remix]
02. Tisto - Louder Than Boom [Extended Mix]
03. Dash Berlin with Cerf, Mitiska & Jaren - "Man On The Run" [Nic Chagall Remix]
04. Nic Chagall feat. Jonathan Mendelsohn - "This Moment" [Prog Mix]
05. Armin van Buuren feat. Jacqueline Govaert - "Never Say Never" [Myon & Shane 54 Remix]
06. Markus Schulz - "Do You Dream" [Uplifting Mix]
07. Gareth Emery - "Metropolis"
08. Ferry Corsten - "Twice In A Blue Moon"
09. Ummet Ozcan vs. W&W - "Synergy"
10. Dave202 - "Departure" [Club Mix]
11. Ilya Soloviev - "Universal Universe"
12. Airborne Angel - "Aviate" [Brake Force Remix]
13. Paul van Dyk feat. Johny McDaid - "Home" [Paul van Dyk Club Mix]
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yROMAN It's not that I don't appreciate history - I just find modern times to be more important
djeclipse24
PostPosted: 31 March 2010 - 09:24:58 (434)  Reply with quote
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yROMAN wrote:
Affected by RichardClairemont's advice, as well some advice from other fellow Trance & Progressive club DJs, I have put the following track list together (all of your constructive criticism is welcome!):

01. Cosmic Gate feat. Emma Hewitt - "Not Enough Time" [Sied van Riel Remix]
02. Tisto - Louder Than Boom [Extended Mix]
03. Dash Berlin with Cerf, Mitiska & Jaren - "Man On The Run" [Nic Chagall Remix]
04. Nic Chagall feat. Jonathan Mendelsohn - "This Moment" [Prog Mix]
05. Armin van Buuren feat. Jacqueline Govaert - "Never Say Never" [Myon & Shane 54 Remix]
06. Markus Schulz - "Do You Dream" [Uplifting Mix]
07. Gareth Emery - "Metropolis"
08. Ferry Corsten - "Twice In A Blue Moon"
09. Ummet Ozcan vs. W&W - "Synergy"
10. Dave202 - "Departure" [Club Mix]
11. Ilya Soloviev - "Universal Universe"
12. Airborne Angel - "Aviate" [Brake Force Remix]
13. Paul van Dyk feat. Johny McDaid - "Home" [Paul van Dyk Club Mix]


I like the tracklist keep it up

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Beadoleoma
PostPosted: 25 July 2010 - 21:31:50 (938)  Reply with quote
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This thread is awesome!
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Beadoleoma Starcraft II
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